“My commitment to the art of photography came from a more profound understanding that it is tied to the complexity of living, dying, suffering and loving in this world and being part of that experience instead of just looking at it.”

Marc Hors is a documentary photographer and storyteller dedicated to capturing the social and cultural fabric of our contemporary society in all of its splendor, nuance, and terrible beauty.

Marc grew up in the outskirts of Barcelona, Spain, and as a teenager, his innate capacity to observe his environment drew him to the art of photography. For him, the act of composing an image from light, and capturing it, was a lifeline to a dream of stepping into many different horizons. Like the circus and traveling fairs that would arrive with their carousels, Marc became mesmerized by this dream of being in each place in all of its 360 degrees of sounds, colors, and textures.

Later, in the 90s, his technical abilities gave him the chance to become a motorcycle racing technician which allowed him to work in race circuits in Europe, Asia, Africa, North America, South America and Australia.

Marc would wander away from the hustle of the race with his 35mm camera in hand to capture the different layers, colors, and nuances of human activity and nature. Almost as if on slow motion, he sought out these worlds away from the fast track and walked into other dimensions.

After 5 years, under the checkered flag existence of race after race, he yearned for a life of wonder and more profound and lasting memories, so he embarked on the path of the traveler.

Marc went backpacking through South America for one year and met many intriguing and creative lives which inspired him to continue on his artistic journey.

Back in Barcelona he studied Photography for one year and became committed to learning on his own all of its technical and artistic aspects and its rich history in the art world.

In 2007, Marc embarked on a 5-year journey on a bicycle from Anchorage, Alaska to Puerto Williams, of the Chilean Antarctic, in search of natural, social and cultural values that characterize the countries of the American continent. He traveled with his wife, Indira (from La Calera, Chile) through 14 countries and 20,000 miles and jointly started a project called 2Greenprints.org to promote the intersections between art, culture and the environment. This photographic bicycle journey was a project promoting solidarity, equity, participation and respect among cultures by linking what they learned from human behaviors, beliefs, traditions with environmental and human rights issues.

Upon returning to the SF Bay Area, Marc and Indira became deeply troubled by the images of refugees floating on overcrowded boats trying to escape the war in the Middle East. As with their experiences among refugees and forced migrants in Latin America, they continued on their path to link humanity through direct participation and through photography, to be able to engage people from different continents and bring awareness to each other’s realities.

They decided to volunteer in Athens, Greece and help the refugees from Syria, Afghanistan, and Iraq in any way that they could. Marc also hoped that in visually capturing the experiences of the people that are in the grips of this crisis, he would be able to bring to light the common humanity of people seeking a world of peace.

“I realized that images as well as being able to tell the story of each person is crucial in helping others see ourselves in each other. I called the exhibit ‘We Are All Refugees’ because we are all responsible to varying degrees for what is happening in this world and refugees, like us, have the same basic human needs, like a living in a safe home, with health and education and meaningful employment. In one word, to live with dignity. Since the beginning of mankind, our common ancestors walked through mountains, prairies and crossed raging rivers seeking a better life. It seems like today’s humanity has forgotten this, so I felt the need to express it with a phrase, “The more we know, the more we can do to help those in need”.